Rehoming a Beagle

I am a homeless Beagle
Looking for someone to love
Maybe my lucky star
Is shining from above

If you think you could love me
And would like to take me home
Just contact Beagle Welfare
By picking up the phone

They can tell you all about me
My good points and 'erm' bad
But if you were my leader
I could be a good lad

I was born a scent dog
My nose stuck to the floor
Even when you feed me
I'm always wanting more

These are only small clues
To the nature of the best
Some of us are very good
I KNOW I AM AT LEAST

But if you love a beagle
You will have a friend for life
As long as its you who wears the pants
Either you or your wife.

ALL I NEED IS LOVE

ANON.

Thinking about Rehoming?

Thinking about adopting a beagle? Before you consider rehoming a Beagle please be sure that you have read the entire contents of this web site and that you have a reasonable understanding of a Beagle's needs and characteristics.

Don't even think of rehoming a Beagle if you are out at work all day - that's why many of them come into rescue in the first place. A lonesome Beagle is a very vocal and destructive little hound. They'll ruin your home and your relationship with your neighbours!

If you think you can give a Beagle all the exercise he needs by taking him for a couple of long walks at the week-end, forget it! These hounds need daily exercise - and that's for the rest of their lives. The oldies may not need as much, but the stimulation of a daily outing keeps their zest for life. Remember, Beagles are scent hounds and many are not reliable off lead!

We have to get to know you before we will allow you to adopt a Beagle. You will need to return a completed Homefinder Questionnaire and you will need to have a home check visit.

Completed Homefinder Questionnaires should be sent to the Rehoming Manager. They will also be able to deal with your enquiries about Beagles that need to be re-homed.

What to Expect

A rescued Beagle will have been uprooted from the home it knows, may have spent some time in kennels, and so it may take some length of time before it feels that your home is also its home.

During the settling-in period you must be prepared for your Beagle to howl or scratch doors, even be destructive when left alone.

Thinking about adopting a beagle?

However, Beagles usually adapt to new circumstances quickly - you just have to have patience and understanding to help it adjust to a new life.

Owners' experiences of owning a rescued Beagle are shared in Happy Tails published in our twice yearly magazine, In Full Cry.

The Rehoming Process

The Beagle Rehoming Process

Rehoming - the process - Surrendering and Adoption

People have to give up their Beagles for many reasons and it is usually a very difficult decision to make.

In the first instance, it is recommended that you contact your dog's breeder. A reputable breeder will always want to help you with any queries or advice you may need. If this is not possible you should contact Beagle Welfare's National Rehoming Co-ordinator.

Sometimes a change in your approach to handling your hound can make a difference and Beagle Welfare may be able offer you specific help and advice which will enable you to keep you Beagle.

Surrendering Your Beagle – The Process

  • The first step is to contact the National Rehoming Co-ordinator by calling 01283 575 175 You can also email [email protected] but please be aware, we cannot re-home dogs via email! We must have direct contact with you.
  • Please have as much information to hand when you call. If you were supplied with any paperwork, when you acquired your Beagle, then this will be useful. We will also require recent, clear photographs of the Beagle.
  • You will initially be asked various questions, including the reasons why you need to give him/her up, if they are used to other pets, children, being left at all, and any particular problems or good points.
  • If your hound has bitten, for whatever reason, or has a temperament problem you must let us know. We have a legal responsibility to advise new owners of all temperament issues no matter how big or small. We reserve the right to refuse Beagles with serious temperament problems as it is unlikely that a home could be found that will take such hounds in.
  • If there is a local Beagle Welfare Area Officer close to you, then they will be asked to contact you and supervise the rehoming of your Beagle, otherwise the National Rehoming co-ordinator will remain in charge of rehoming the Beagle.
  • When we take a hound in, we require owners to sign the ownership over to Beagle Welfare and hand over any Kennel Club registrations documents and vaccination records. If at all possible, make sure that vaccinations are up to date.
  • If your hound needs to be taken in urgently, then we will try to help as quickly as possible. We have a number of specialist Beagle kennels located around the country and we also have the services of experienced foster homes. There are times when there are no kennelling or fostering spaces available. If suitable, Beagles can be placed on the website Rehoming List and remain in their own home until a new home is found for them.
  • We aim to find the best possible permanent home for all our Beagles as soon as possible. New beagle owners are home checked by our Area Officers and volunteers, before being able to adopt a hound from us. Many of our homes have owned Beagles for many years and are experienced Beagle owners.

Adopting a Beagle – The Process

1. Download and fill in Application to adopt a beagle

2. Wait for sombody to contact you regarding a home visit if needed.

3. if application accepted start looking for the beagle for you.

The Beagle Rehoming Process Rehoming a dog, any dog, should never be undertaken lightly and all potential adopters are urged to fully research the breed – have you read the entire contents of this website? If you haven't got the time and patience to do that, then you certainly won't have the time and patience to live, harmoniously, with a Beagle! Consider your lifestyle, your family and your working commitments, is a Beagle the right breed for you and more importantly (as far as we're concerned!) are you the right person for a Beagle?

If you have decided a Beagle is the dog for you, but for various reasons you would prefer one that isn't a puppy, you might like to consider giving a home to a ‘rescued' hound. There are many reasons for rehoming Beagles.

Sometimes the hound has not been given the necessary love and care and has developed some bad habits through lack of attention and training.

Often the owner's situation changes and the Beagle finds, through no fault of its own, that it can no longer live with them. Divorce, illness and bereavement, can all be reasons why a Beagle needs a new home.

Beagle Welfare has also helped with finding special homes for hounds which have been ‘institutionalised' for several years, used as breeding stock for Beagles sent to laboratories, or in puppy farms supplying pet shops and dealers.

A rescued Beagle will have been uprooted from the home it knows, may have spent some time in kennels, and so it may take some length of time before it feels that your home is also its home. During the settling-in period you must be prepared for your Beagle to howl or scratch doors, even be destructive when left alone. However, Beagles usually adapt to new circumstances quickly - you just have to have patience and understanding to help it adjust to a new life.